Veuve Clicquot publishes the third edition of its international barometer on female entrepreneurship

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Since 2019, the Bold programme of the Champagne House owned by the LVMH group, which aims to support female entrepreneurship, has included a barometer measuring the attitudes of women (and men) on this subject. The latest edition, 2023, shows that there is still a long way to go to facilitate women’s initiatives…

 

In 1805, Barbe Nicole Clicquot was just 27 when her husband, Philippe Clicquot-Muiron, died.

 

She took over the reins of the House he had founded 33 years earlier, the only one authorised to produce rosé champagne.

 

History does not say whether this colour, at the time more associated with women, helped the success story of the woman who gave her name to a world-famous brand, now owned by Lvmh.

 

An inclusive programme for women

 

The fact remains that the illustrious Veuve embodies female entrepreneurship, and the logical consequence is an international programme “designed to increase the inclusion, impact and visibility of women entrepreneurs” . Bold By Veuve Clicquot, as it is called, aims to “encourage generations of women to be ever more daring”, as the House explains on its website.

 

In addition to a prize, the Veuve Clicquot Bold Woman Award, which celebrated its 50th anniversary at the end of 2022 and has honoured 450 women entrepreneurs in 27 countries since its creation, the Bold programme has also included, since 2019, an international barometer, a “unique study to decipher and analyse the situation of women entrepreneurs around the world” .

 

“By creating this tool, the House wants to encourage, inspire and break the glass ceiling of entrepreneurship for women” said Jean-Marc Gallot, CEO of Veuve Clicquot.

 

Third edition

 

The third edition of the Bold barometer has just been published.

 

More than 49,000 women and men, entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs from 25 countries on 5 continents, were asked to share their vision of entrepreneurship online. In other words, “What drives them, what worries them and what makes them tick” .

 

The result: “a unique, multicultural and intergenerational picture” . “By interviewing 25 countries, we realised that they were not all equal when it came to entrepreneurship, and that we could learn from others. At Veuve Clicquot, we are convinced that this international vision will give rise to concrete tools and best practices. Together, let’s take inspiration and listen to each other to get things moving”, says Jean-Marc Gallot (Veuve Clicquot).

 

 

 

But even if we haven’t yet had the benefit of hindsight since the launch, there have already been some significant developments. And not exactly in a good way.

 

“In 2021, we saw a boom in female entrepreneurship. While the Covid crisis revealed a surge in resilience, two years later we are seeing a loss of momentum in entrepreneurship, and even a decline in some countries,” notes Veuve Cliquot on its website.

 

Where are the women?

 

In more detail, the Barometer highlights four major themes.

 

Veuve Clicquot sums up the first with the question “Where are the women? One observation: male entrepreneurship still far outstrips female entrepreneurship” .

 

This is despite the fact that many women want to become entrepreneurs, particularly those under the age of 30. In Nigeria, 91% of women under 30 even aspire to this goal. In France, 35% of women of all ages (up to 59) and 59% of women under 30 are entrepreneurs.

 

The second theme – “Ah, if I were a man…” – addresses the view that women entrepreneurs should act like men in order to succeed. This assumption is still widely held around the world. 57% of women think so in South Africa and 50% in France.

 

In France, only 42% of women feel it is important to have a role model to follow in order to become an entrepreneur. And while 93% of women aspiring to be entrepreneurs say they are inspired by female entrepreneurs, only 18% are able to name one locally!

 

The initiators of the Bold programme therefore suggest following the model of another country, South Africa: out of 97% of women aspiring to be entrepreneurs, 72% can name one locally.

 

Funding: an obstacle

 

The question of financing is another major theme of the Barometer. In 2023, the findings are the same as in 2021: fundraising is an obstacle to women’s entrepreneurship, emphasises Veuve Clicquot.

 

52% of French women and 55% of Japanese women think that finance is more likely to be available to men than to women entrepreneurs.

 

And for 69% of women in the UK, financing, investment and fundraising will be more difficult for women in 2023.

 

On a positive note, the Bold Barometer highlights the great resilience of women when it comes to entrepreneurship. Only 24% of women entrepreneurs in France say they are less willing to take risks professionally because they have already experienced a failure.

 

Being your own boss

 

The Bold Barometer also stresses that the number one reason for entrepreneurship worldwide (and for 48% of women in France) is to “be their own boss”.

 

“If women want to become their own bosses and change the world, let’s help them. Let’s support them and make this new world a world of equal opportunities, serving the economy, politics and society as a whole”, says the Champagne House.

 

It is doing this through another initiative, its Bold Woman Award, which is designed to alleviate one of the difficulties identified by the Barometer: that of identifying with inspirational role models. The call for candidates was launched on the Veuve Clicquot website on 10 May and will close on 3 July.

 

The jury, made up of around fifteen committed personalities, will meet in September to select the winners of the two prizes concerned, the Bold Woman Award and the Bold Future Award, dedicated to a start-up woman whose company has been in existence for less than 3 years. The awards will be presented for the first time outside Paris, in Marseille, in October.

 

 

Read also > Veuve-Clicquot: a voyage of discovery to learn more about champagne

Featured photo : © Press[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row njt-role=”not-logged-in”][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Since 2019, the Bold programme of the Champagne House owned by the LVMH group, which aims to support female entrepreneurship, has included a barometer measuring the attitudes of women (and men) on this subject. The latest edition, 2023, shows that there is still a long way to go to facilitate women’s initiatives…

 

In 1805, Barbe Nicole Clicquot was just 27 when her husband, Philippe Clicquot-Muiron, died.

 

She took over the reins of the House he had founded 33 years earlier, the only one authorised to produce rosé champagne.

 

History does not say whether this colour, at the time more associated with women, helped the success story of the woman who gave her name to a world-famous brand, now owned by Lvmh.

 

An inclusive programme for women

 

The fact remains that the illustrious Veuve embodies female entrepreneurship, and the logical consequence is an international programme “designed to increase the inclusion, impact and visibility of women entrepreneurs” . Bold By Veuve Clicquot, as it is called, aims to “encourage generations of women to be ever more daring”, as the House explains on its website.

 

In addition to a prize, the Veuve Clicquot Bold Woman Award, which celebrated its 50th anniversary at the end of 2022 and has honoured 450 women entrepreneurs in 27 countries since its creation, the Bold programme has also included, since 2019, an international barometer, a “unique study to decipher and analyse the situation of women entrepreneurs around the world” .

 

“By creating this tool, the House wants to encourage, inspire and break the glass ceiling of entrepreneurship for women” said Jean-Marc Gallot, CEO of Veuve Clicquot.

 

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Since 2019, the Bold programme of the Champagne House owned by the LVMH group, which aims to support female entrepreneurship, has included a barometer measuring the attitudes of women (and men) on this subject. The latest edition, 2023, shows that there is still a long way to go to facilitate women’s initiatives…

 

In 1805, Barbe Nicole Clicquot was just 27 when her husband, Philippe Clicquot-Muiron, died.

 

She took over the reins of the House he had founded 33 years earlier, the only one authorised to produce rosé champagne.

 

History does not say whether this colour, at the time more associated with women, helped the success story of the woman who gave her name to a world-famous brand, now owned by Lvmh.

 

An inclusive programme for women

 

The fact remains that the illustrious Veuve embodies female entrepreneurship, and the logical consequence is an international programme “designed to increase the inclusion, impact and visibility of women entrepreneurs” . Bold By Veuve Clicquot, as it is called, aims to “encourage generations of women to be ever more daring”, as the House explains on its website.

 

In addition to a prize, the Veuve Clicquot Bold Woman Award, which celebrated its 50th anniversary at the end of 2022 and has honoured 450 women entrepreneurs in 27 countries since its creation, the Bold programme has also included, since 2019, an international barometer, a “unique study to decipher and analyse the situation of women entrepreneurs around the world” .

 

“By creating this tool, the House wants to encourage, inspire and break the glass ceiling of entrepreneurship for women” said Jean-Marc Gallot, CEO of Veuve Clicquot.

 

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Sophie Michentef
Sophie Michentef has worked for more than 30 years in the professional press. For fifteen years, she managed the French and international editorial staff of the Journal du Textile. She now puts her press, textile, fashion, and luxury expertise at the service of newspapers, professional organizations, and companies.

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