Paris: Palaces forced to give up the summer season

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While the reopening of European borders on July 1 to some travellers from outside the EU means that certain establishments such as Fauchon l’Hôtel Paris can reopen their doors, Parisian palaces will remain on the sidelines until September.

 

The future of the hotel industry is still hazy, with France posting a flat encephalogram with activity falling by 90%.

 

In Paris, a “must-see” destination, the hotels are reopening at a snail’s pace, adjusting their services in line with health requirements: Plexiglas protecting the reception area, masked staff and gloves for those carrying the luggage. All these measures will soon be recognized by Bureau Veritas certification.

 

“This is the antithesis of our hospitality business. However, if these health protocols can be seen as a regression in service, I think the opposite is true, remarks Jérôme Montantème, General Manager of the Fauchon l’Hôtel ParisBecause they offer a real opportunity to go further in a tailor-made service. »

 

“After cheap hotels, mid-range and top-of-the-range hotels, luxury hotels will be the last to recover,” said Christophe Laure of Umih Prestige, who estimates that the recovery could take until 2023.

 

Main customers absent

 

For the 31 French palaces, 12 of which are located in Paris, the recovery is more complex. While these five-star hotels with exceptional characteristics have opened up bookings for July, Christophe Laure said that demand was “practically non-existent”.

 

© Meurice

 

Indeed, the cancellation of Fashion Week and the postponement of Roland Garros are paralysing the recovery of activity. The closure of borders for travellers from the United States in particular, because European officials do not consider the Covid-19 crisis to be under control there, also deprives luxury establishments of their main clientele.

 

At least 80% of the clients of the capital’s palaces normally come from overseas, particularly from North America (25-35%), as well as from Asia and the Middle East.

 

The only Parisian palace to open to the public for the summer is La Réserve, although even without competition, it currently operates at 75% occupancy during the week and 45% at weekends.

 

© Plaza Athénée

 

“The Parisian palaces all wanted to reopen at the beginning of July, but there are no reservations, deplored François Delahaye, director of operations for the Dorchester Collection for the Plaza Athénée et Meurice in Paris. Because of the quarantine put in place by the States, there is no way to get customers. If they come to France this summer, the British and Americans will go to Cannes, Saint-Tropez or Biarritz, not Paris. At this stage, we are thinking of reopening on 1 September. We need a fortnight to be ready”.

 

Significant losses

 

At Le Meurice and Plaza Athénée, 95% of employees are currently on short-time working. However, as long as they remain closed, Le Meurice loses 4 million euros per month and the Plaza Athénée 3 million euros.

 

“Our owner has injected tens of millions into the Plaza Athénée and Le Meurice. All the other owners have done the same,” said François Delahaye.

 

A delayed recovery for the capital’s luxury establishments, which is counting on a prompt resumption of major events to relaunch their activity next September. The Bristol is one of the first palaces to have officially announced its reopening on 1 September.

 

 

Read also > ECONOMY : HOW THAILAND PLANS TO BOOST LUXURY TOURISM

 

Featured photo : © Plaza Athénée[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row njt-role=”not-logged-in”][vc_column][vc_column_text]

While the reopening of European borders on July 1 to some travellers from outside the EU means that certain establishments such as Fauchon l’Hôtel Paris can reopen their doors, Parisian palaces will remain on the sidelines until September.

 

The future of the hotel industry is still hazy, with France posting a flat encephalogram with activity falling by 90%.[…][/vc_column_text][vc_cta h2=”This article is for subscribers only.” h2_font_container=”font_size:16″ h2_use_theme_fonts=”yes” h4=”Subscribe now!” h4_font_container=”font_size:32|line_height:bas” h4_use_theme_fonts=”yes” txt_align=”center” color=”black” add_button=”right” btn_title=”I SUBSCRIBE!” btn_color=”danger” btn_size=”lg” btn_align=”center” use_custom_fonts_h2=”true” use_custom_fonts_h4=”true” btn_button_block=”true” btn_custom_onclick=”true” btn_link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fluxus-plus.com%2Fen%2Fabonnements-et-newsletter-2%2F|||”]Unlimited access to all the articles and live a new reading experience, preview contents, exclusive newsletters…

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While the reopening of European borders on July 1 to some travellers from outside the EU means that certain establishments such as Fauchon l’Hôtel Paris can reopen their doors, Parisian palaces will remain on the sidelines until September.

 

The future of the hotel industry is still hazy, with France posting a flat encephalogram with activity falling by 90%.[…][/vc_column_text][vc_cta h2=”This article is for subscribers only.” h2_font_container=”font_size:16″ h2_use_theme_fonts=”yes” h4=”Subscribe now!” h4_font_container=”font_size:32|line_height:bas” h4_use_theme_fonts=”yes” txt_align=”center” color=”black” add_button=”right” btn_title=”I SUBSCRIBE!” btn_color=”danger” btn_size=”lg” btn_align=”center” use_custom_fonts_h2=”true” use_custom_fonts_h4=”true” btn_button_block=”true” btn_custom_onclick=”true” btn_link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fluxus-plus.com%2Fen%2Fabonnements-et-newsletter-2%2F|||”]Unlimited access to all the articles and live a new reading experience, preview contents, exclusive newsletters…

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Thanks to its extensive knowledge of these sectors, the Luxus + editorial team deciphers for its readers the main economic and technological stakes in fashion, watchmaking, jewelry, gastronomy, perfumes and cosmetics, hotels, and prestigious real estate.

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