MSCHF sells its microscopic handbag for nearly $64,000

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The microscopic luxury handbag created by American art collective MSCHF sold for $63,750. The sale of this unofficial Louis Vuitton product was organized between June 19 and 27 by Joopiter, the online auction house founded by Pharrell William, the musician and current artistic director of the Maison’s men’s collections.

 

A replica of a Vuitton product

 

Buying a product with your eyes closed – that’s fine – but buying a product that’s barely visible to the naked eye? One man did just that, and paid $63,750 (57,825 euros) for it.

 

Called the “Microscopic Handbag”, this object is invisible without a microscope and a magnifying video screen. Made from photopolymer resin – used in 3D printing – it measures 657 by 222 by 700 micrometers.

 

MSCHF (pronounced Mischief), the New York collective behind this controversial new release, claims in its press release that this neon yellow-green bag is “narrow enough to fit through the eye of a needle” and “is smaller than a grain of sea salt.”

 

Its design echoes that of Louis Vuitton’s monogrammed OneTheGo handbag. Priced from 2,450 euros, it can usually hold a phone, notepad, wallet and tote bag.

 

The MSCHF case, on the other hand, holds nothing at all and is purely aesthetic.

 

MSCHF

 

This unofficial product was auctioned by Joopiter, Pharrell Williams’ online auction house, as part of the Phriends sale.

 

Kevin Wiesner, creative director of MSCHF, told the New York Times that the collective had not asked either Pharrell Williams or Louis Vuitton for permission to use its logo or design.

 

Pharrell likes big hats, so we made him an incredibly small bag,” he told the paper.

 

Questioning the usefulness of luxury…

 

Dubbed the “Ant Bag”, it turns out to be a work of art rather than a wearable product.

 

The idea here was to play on the contrasts between the object’s price and size, while at the same time sending a strong nod to the micro-bag trend that has been sweeping the market since 2017 with Jacquemus’ Mini Chiquito Bag. A bag that had caused a stir on social networks and whose dimensions couldn’t even hold a smartphone.

 

Jacquemus

 

At best, it could be used as a “giant” wallet to hold cards, keys and tubes of lipstick.

 

Since then, a number of brands, including Acne, Burberry, and more recently Fendi and Céline, have taken the plunge and launched nano-bags.

 

Behind this project, the American art collective is proposing a genuine reflection on utility in luxury.

 

MSCHF declared in a press release: “As a once functional object such as a handbag becomes smaller and smaller, its status as an object becomes more and more abstract until it is no more than a signifier of the brand“.

 

Not without irony, the collective added “Previous small leather handbags still required one hand to carry them“.

 

MSCHF, master of the divisive stunt

 

MSCHF first became known for its excesses in the art world – selling fake Andy Warhol drawings or cutting up Damien Hirst paintings – before turning its attention to the world of luxury fashion.

 

Once again, this new launch by MSCHF has the merit of getting people talking and not leaving them indifferent. An approved technique for capturing attention on social networks, transposed here to the real world.

 

This Brooklyn-based art collective is no stranger to bags and fashion items.

 

Last year, for example, they created a full-size black handbag bearing the Mschf logo and the words Made In Italy in Texas. A cheeky way of questioning the manufacturing label often found on designer handbags.

 

Satan Shoes in collaboration with Lil Nas X © MSCHF

 

But we have to go back to 2016 to trace the history of MSCHF’s many “misdeeds”, which are so many irreverent artistic detour from the world of fashion and luxury.

 

MSCHF made a name for itself with a few media coups, such as its Jesus Shoes project, pairs of shoes sold for $3,000, where the sole of a pair of Nike sneakers contained holy water (2019) before proposing in 2021 their evil counterpart, the Satan shoes where the sole contained “human blood” according to the press release.

 

A Satan Shoes in collaboration with hip hop singer Lil Nas X, which didn’t go down well with Nike, who sued MSCHF for illegal use of its Air Max 97 image, before settling the case out of court.

 

The same year, the collective did it again, all pun intended, with their “Birkinstocks“. Here, Birkin handbags from Hermès – priced at $11,000 each – were torn apart to create Birkenstock-style sandals. The pair of shoes in question sold for up to $76,000.

 

© MSCHF

 

More recently, cartoonish rubber boots inspired by the Astro Boy character have gone viral.

 

These “Big Red Boots” soon found their way onto the feet of artists such as Doja Cat, Iggy Azalea and Janelle Monáe.

 

For Paris Fashion Week, MSCHF is offering a first iteration of its disproportionately large boots in a yellow version.

 

The design of these “Big Yellow Boots” borrows from other “ugly shoes” cherished by members of Generation Z, crocs.

 

© MSCHF

 

In recent days, MSCHF has even released a black model, soberly entitled “Big Black Boots”. Once again, these latest models are sure to create a buzz, especially during Paris Haute Couture Week, which opens this Monday.

 

Read also >Fashion and cartoons: a colorful marriage

 

Featured photo : © Louis Vuitton [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row njt-role=”not-logged-in”][vc_column][vc_column_text]

The microscopic luxury handbag created by American art collective MSCHF sold for $63,750. The sale of this unofficial Louis Vuitton product was organized between June 19 and 27 by Joopiter, the online auction house founded by Pharrell William, the musician and current artistic director of the Maison’s men’s collections.

 

A replica of a Vuitton product

 

Buying a product with your eyes closed – that’s fine – but buying a product that’s barely visible to the naked eye? One man did just that, and paid $63,750 (57,825 euros) for it.

 

Called the “Microscopic Handbag”, this object is invisible without a microscope and a magnifying video screen. Made from photopolymer resin – used in 3D printing – it measures 657 by 222 by 700 micrometers.

 

MSCHF (pronounced Mischief), the New York collective behind this controversial new release, claims in its press release that this neon yellow-green bag is “narrow enough to fit through the eye of a needle” and “is smaller than a grain of sea salt.”

 

Its design echoes that of Louis Vuitton’s monogrammed OneTheGo handbag. Priced from 2,450 euros, it can usually hold a phone, notepad, wallet and tote bag.

 

The MSCHF case, on the other hand, holds nothing at all and is purely aesthetic.

 

MSCHF

 

This unofficial product was auctioned by Joopiter, Pharrell Williams’ online auction house, as part of the Phriends sale.

 

Kevin Wiesner, creative director of MSCHF, told the New York Times that the collective had not asked either Pharrell Williams or Louis Vuitton for permission to use its logo or design.

 

Pharrell likes big hats, so we made him an incredibly small bag,” he told the paper.

 

Questioning the usefulness of luxury…

 

Dubbed the “Ant Bag”, it turns out to be a work of art rather than a wearable product.

 

The idea here was to play on the contrasts between the object’s price and size, while at the same time sending a strong nod to the micro-bag trend that has been sweeping the market since 2017 with Jacquemus’ Mini Chiquito Bag. A bag that had caused a stir on social networks and whose dimensions couldn’t even hold a smartphone.

 

Jacquemus

 

At best, it could be used as a “giant” wallet to hold cards, keys and tubes of lipstick.

 

Since then, a number of brands, including Acne, Burberry, and more recently Fendi and Céline, have taken the plunge and launched nano-bags.

 

Behind this project, the American art collective is proposing a genuine reflection on utility in luxury.

 

MSCHF declared in a press release: “As a once functional object such as a handbag becomes smaller and smaller, its status as an object becomes more and more abstract until it is no more than a signifier of the brand“.

 

Not without irony, the collective added “Previous small leather handbags still required one hand to carry them“.

 

MSCHF, master of the divisive stunt

 

MSCHF first became known for its excesses in the art world – selling fake Andy Warhol drawings or cutting up Damien Hirst paintings – before turning its attention to the world of luxury fashion.

 

Once again, this new launch by MSCHF has the merit of getting people talking and not leaving them indifferent. An approved technique for capturing attention on social networks, transposed here to the real world.

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The microscopic luxury handbag created by American art collective MSCHF sold for $63,750. The sale of this unofficial Louis Vuitton product was organized between June 19 and 27 by Joopiter, the online auction house founded by Pharrell William, the musician and current artistic director of the Maison’s men’s collections.

 

A replica of a Vuitton product

 

Buying a product with your eyes closed – that’s fine – but buying a product that’s barely visible to the naked eye? One man did just that, and paid $63,750 (57,825 euros) for it.

 

Called the “Microscopic Handbag”, this object is invisible without a microscope and a magnifying video screen. Made from photopolymer resin – used in 3D printing – it measures 657 by 222 by 700 micrometers.

 

MSCHF (pronounced Mischief), the New York collective behind this controversial new release, claims in its press release that this neon yellow-green bag is “narrow enough to fit through the eye of a needle” and “is smaller than a grain of sea salt.”

 

Its design echoes that of Louis Vuitton’s monogrammed OneTheGo handbag. Priced from 2,450 euros, it can usually hold a phone, notepad, wallet and tote bag.

 

The MSCHF case, on the other hand, holds nothing at all and is purely aesthetic.

 

MSCHF

 

This unofficial product was auctioned by Joopiter, Pharrell Williams’ online auction house, as part of the Phriends sale.

 

Kevin Wiesner, creative director of MSCHF, told the New York Times that the collective had not asked either Pharrell Williams or Louis Vuitton for permission to use its logo or design.

 

Pharrell likes big hats, so we made him an incredibly small bag,” he told the paper.

 

Questioning the usefulness of luxury…

 

Dubbed the “Ant Bag”, it turns out to be a work of art rather than a wearable product.

 

The idea here was to play on the contrasts between the object’s price and size, while at the same time sending a strong nod to the micro-bag trend that has been sweeping the market since 2017 with Jacquemus’ Mini Chiquito Bag. A bag that had caused a stir on social networks and whose dimensions couldn’t even hold a smartphone.

 

Jacquemus

 

At best, it could be used as a “giant” wallet to hold cards, keys and tubes of lipstick.

 

Since then, a number of brands, including Acne, Burberry, and more recently Fendi and Céline, have taken the plunge and launched nano-bags.

 

Behind this project, the American art collective is proposing a genuine reflection on utility in luxury.

 

MSCHF declared in a press release: “As a once functional object such as a handbag becomes smaller and smaller, its status as an object becomes more and more abstract until it is no more than a signifier of the brand“.

 

Not without irony, the collective added “Previous small leather handbags still required one hand to carry them“.

 

MSCHF, master of the divisive stunt

 

MSCHF first became known for its excesses in the art world – selling fake Andy Warhol drawings or cutting up Damien Hirst paintings – before turning its attention to the world of luxury fashion.

 

Once again, this new launch by MSCHF has the merit of getting people talking and not leaving them indifferent. An approved technique for capturing attention on social networks, transposed here to the real world.

 

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Picture of Victor Gosselin
Victor Gosselin
Victor Gosselin is a journalist specializing in luxury, HR, tech, retail, and editorial consulting. A graduate of EIML Paris, he has been working in the luxury industry for 9 years. Fond of fashion, Asia, history, and long format, this ex-Welcome To The Jungle and Time To Disrupt likes to analyze the news from a sociological and cultural angle.

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